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C3 SPEAQquest
C3: create, collaborate, communicate ...
with the Writing and Production Processes and the support of integrated technologies. Choose how you would like to
express yourself, be creative and share while you follow the suggestions, prompts and links to complete your task.

  Students    

    Let's Write     Let's Produce media 

 

Welcome
Home
Teachers <
Write!
Produce!

correction

 Teachers' Writing Links :

across the curriculum

A-V creative writing

ESL writing lessons

Iwrite (teachers)

L.A. Writing exemplars

LA worksheets

Mystery thinkquest

N Writing Project: Digital Is

One Word: writing flow

Online writing assistant

open writing

Scholastic resources

Supporting Writing

Teacher Guide to Different Types of Writing ($)

The Writing Process

U. of Victoria Writing Center

Writing actiities+

Writing activities

Writing Models

Writing strategy guides

Writing Workshop

Writing Your Own Interactive Story -
Secondary (2nd cycle)

Writingfix
lessons, ideas, and resources

Writing Resources

Write 101

Writing a-z.com

Teaching writing

informal, in-class writing

Galaxy writing

Figment writing community
Adapting checklists:

Writing basics-ABC practice

Basic Writing Templates

Writing Templates

Digital resources

Media Awareness

Basic writing starters

Technology in support of...
 
Building a writing community $
 
Story Mapping and other strategies
Technology

Production Links

Online Web2.0 course

Using Google Docs
 
Evaluation
Writing Rubric Generator
Rubrics
Script Rubric (MELS)
Storyboard Rubric (MELS)
 
CASLT Writing assessment-  - About you
 
Engrade - Online Teaching & Gradebook Suite
E-Portfolios for Learning

Portfolio development

 

Teachers :

The C3 site strives 

1) to provide creative resources for teachers to direct/guide students through tasks using the writing and production processes. Teachers may map out a path or paths through the site that will lead the students to accomplished assigned tasks. (suggestions) (BOOKMARKS)

 Right click on your host and choose play to listen.

2) to enable teachers to support students and provide differentiated possibilities for writing and production. Teachers may refer students to the possibilities on the site, encourage experimentation and the creation of writing and production portfolios as well as using sections of the site for specific remediation.  (suggestions) (Pamphlet) (BOOKMARKS)

3) to encourage students to develop their own possibilities for self-expression through writing and production activities and provide creative tools to accomplish their personal goals.  (suggestions) (BOOKMARKS)

Videos: How to teach Writing from EHOW videos:  see the list of other possibilities - including video transcripts.

From Microsoft: OneNote and the Writing Process or view and download a pdf version

PDF resources : Types of Writing,   Writing Process , ...

  The Grizzwells

UK Text Type explanations from LA elementary and secondary for a better understanding of the features and structures: Narrative  Non-Fiction Poetry  Traditional Tales

Writing Process Posters & Diagrams

ICT in support of C3 PowerPoint  PDF version

More PowerPoint presentations: by ddeubel Posted to EFLClassroom PPTS to help Writing instruction.

Google tools in support of Bloom's revised Taxonomy - Kathy Schrock

MELS Progression of Learning at the Secondary Level

- Language Repertoire  (> site) (> pdf) ...functional language, etc

- >Strategies

- >Processes

- >Texts

- > Culture

Review the elements of the processes: Write   Produce 

         How do students use a writing process? (source PFEQ)

Cycle One

Cycle Two

Teacher's guides

 

 

 

 

 

Deconstructing Texts

Before engaging in the writing process, students have access to texts similar to the one they plan on writing.

They take time to deconstruct and examine the texts, and compare their similarities and differences.

They recognize patterns in the texts by focusing on specific aspects: internal features (topic/information, language, text components), and external features (purpose, audience, culture).

They make a list of criteria that summarizes the characteristics of an effective text. This list and the deconstructed texts can be used as valuable resources when writing their own text. 

Preparing to Write - Before beginning to write, students determine the purpose of writing, the target audience, the intended effect on the audience as well as the appropriate text type.

They may:

– brainstorm with others about ideas and topics

– activate prior knowledge of the language to be used and of the chosen topic

– draw upon ideas and personal memories

– construct an outline of the text

– research the topic

– use various resources

 

Preparing to Write Phase  Before beginning to write, students need to set clear communicative goals by considering the text and its internal and external features. They may do the following:

– brainstorm topics and ideas with others (e.g. What do I want to write about? What topic would interest my audience?)

– activate prior knowledge of the chosen topic (e.g. What do I already know about the topic?)

– define the purpose for writing (i.e. express, inform, direct)

– target an audience (e.g. Who is my audience? What do they already know about the topic? How can I engage their interest?)

– choose a text (e.g. Do I want to write a poem or a story?)

– select appropriate language (e.g. What kind of language will best suit my purpose and audience?)

– construct an outline of the text

– research the topic

– reflect on topic and ideas

– use various resources

Writing the Draft(s)

Students begin to write and focus on the meaning of the message. They may:

– set down ideas, opinions, thoughts, needs and feelings

– leave space to make adjustments

– refer to their outline while writing

– confer with others whenever possible

 

Writing the Draft Phase

Students begin to write and focus on the meaning of the message. They may do the following:

– set down ideas, opinions, thoughts and feelings

– leave space to make adjustments

– refer to their outline while writing

– adjust their outline as they are writing to include new ideas

– reflect on the ideas written

– confer with others

Revising

The students read what they have written to clarify the meaning of their text and improve the organization of their ideas. They may:

– rethink what has been written

– focus on how well they have conveyed meaning and ideas as well as on organization and word choice

– share their writing with classmates

– take feedback into account

– use strategies for revising

– add, substitute, delete and rearrange ideas and words

– rework their drafts

Revising Phase

Students read what they have written to clarify the meaning of their text and improve the organization of their ideas. They may do the following:

– reflect on what has been written

– focus on how well they have conveyed meaning and ideas, as well as on their organization and word choice

– assess how well their text reflects intended purpose, audience and cultural context

– share their writing with peers

– accept and integrate feedback

– add, substitute, remove and rearrange ideas and words

– rework their drafts

Editing

Students focus on technical errors including spelling, capitalization, punctuation, sentence structure and language usage.

They may:

– use paper or digital resources such as written models,

dictionaries, thesauruses, grammar references

– consult peers and the teacher

Editing Phase

Students focus on the formulation of their text by correcting errors of spelling, capitalization, punctuation, sentence structure and language usage.

They may do the following:

– use resources such as written models, dictionaries, thesauruses, grammar references

– consult peers and the teacher

– accept and integrate feedback

– use a personalized checklist to proofread for common errors

– correct errors and write a final copy

Publishing

If the students decide to publish a text, they may:

– choose a suitable format for the product (e.g. a class newspaper or Web page)

– make a polished copy

– share it with the intended audience

Publishing Phase (Optional)

If students decide to publish a text, they may do the following:

– make a polished copy

– share it with the intended audience

Production  (source PFEQ) 

    How do students use a production process?

Cycle One

Cycle Two

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Preproduction Phase

Before producing a media text, students may:


– brainstorm with others to find a topic

– select a media text type to produce

– write a focus sentence such as: “We are going to create a poster that we will display near the entrances of public buildings in the neighbourhood, inviting others to help us carry out our class project to clean up the local park.” This sentence guides the group throughout the task

– activate prior knowledge of the chosen topic, language, type of media text(s) and past experiences

– research the topic using resources from various media

– clarify, reshape or confirm the meaning a media text holds for them

– create a script or storyboard (the storyboard includes elements such as determining the purpose, context and target audience; arranging the sequence of events; deciding on the content; taking the length of the production into account; using and determining roles and responsibilities within the group)

– validate the media text by doing a practice-run with a sample audience

– make adjustments according to feedback (in the production process, the term ‘editing’ refers to any adjustments made.)

 

 

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Preproduction Phase

In the preproduction phase, students plan their media text. They may do the following:

– brainstorm with others to find and explore a topic (e.g. What do we want to talk about? What do we want to say about the topic?)

– activate prior knowledge about the topic (e.g. What do we already know about the topic? What do we need to find out?)

– research the topic

– brainstorm and select a medium to produce the media text (e.g. What medium will best suit our purpose and reach our audience?)

– activate prior knowledge about characteristics of similar texts (e.g. What do we already know about this medium? What are the characteristics of an effective media text?)

– define the purpose for producing the text (e.g. What do we want to accomplish with our text? [i.e. express, inform or direct])

– target an audience (e.g. Who is our audience and how can we best address them? [tone, level of formality, audience’s background knowledge and interests])

– write a focus sentence that guides the group throughout the task, such as: Our group is going to create a news article for the school Web site, highlighting the purpose of an upcoming fundraising event.

– determine what type of language, images and media conventions and techniques would best achieve their purpose and reach their audience

– use strategies (e.g. take notes, use semantic mapping, infer) and resources (e.g. portfolios, previous work, response journals)

– create a storyboard–a visual plan of the production that includes elements such as the action depicted through a sequence of frames; the time needed for each frame; media conventions and techniques used in each frame; the written narration and/or dialogue in each frame

– write a script, if needed, using the writing process (e.g. a script for a short film, a brief text to accompany an advertisement)

– determine roles and responsibilities within the group

– use a group log to keep traces of process and learning throughout all phases of production (e.g. note down decisions made by the group, list of materials needed, questions for the teacher)

– validate the ideas for the text with peers and teacher

– make adjustments to their plan according to feedback

 

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Production Phase

In the production phase, students may:


– create the media text using resources and taking into account the elements decided upon during the preproduction stage


– include elements of the media text type such as images, symbols and narration


– use a writing process according to the task at hand
 

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Production Phase

In the production phase, students produce their media text. They may do the following:

– create the media text using strategies and resources, taking into account the elements decided upon during the preproduction phase

– use media conventions and techniques such as images, symbols, signs, logos and narration

– use information and communications technologies

– validate the preliminary version of the production by presenting it to a sample audience (e.g. small group of peers, teacher)

– edit and add final touches, taking feedback from sample audience into account

 

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Postproduction Phase


In the postproduction phase, students may:


– edit, add final touches and make further adjustments, taking feedback into account


– present the media text to the intended audience

 

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Postproduction Phase

In the postproduction phase, students present and reflect on their media text.

They may do the following:

– present the text to the intended audience

– reflect and evaluate individually, with the teacher and the production group on the following elements:

• audience reaction and feedback

• production process

• cooperation

• language repertoire

• final version of the production

• goals for future productions

 

the Moodle 'Online Web2.0 course' for teachers!

Lesson Plans: writes and produces

  1. 1. For the Love of Publication! from PBS - video presentation - Identify what a ‘zine is. What is in a ‘zine? How is a ‘zine made?

  2.  | Watch Video               Grade Level(s) LA : 6-8, 9-11  Disciplines Covered: Visual Arts
     

Web 2 Projects (pdf) 

 

Top 10 Alternatives to YouTube
 
  1. School Tube - Excellent safe place for students and teachers to share and view video.
  2. WatchKnow - Wonderful site with 1000's of videos for students in multiple subjects, organized in a clear, precise way.
  3. Neo K-12- All videos on this amazing site are a 100% safe. Also, there is a complete suite of educational tools for educators to choose from, such as quizzes, presentations, and more.
  4. Snag Learning - An interesting site that brings documentary-style films to engage students in discussion and classroom participation.
  5. Qwiki - A very new (alpha) site that brings an innovative twist on video experience. While the content is still growing, one can't help but notice that amount of promise that is shown here.
  6. Explore- Great site, similar to Discovery Streaming for educational video. Users can either view on the web or download for their own convenience.
  7. Kids Tube - Excellent filtered site for kids' videos.
  8. Teacher Tube - Excellent site for educators to find videos for students and share in the wonderful educational online community.
  9. Vimeo- A nice very popular alternative to YouTube. I recommend using with a filter of some sort, or view all content before introducing to students.
  10. Clip Blast - A huge collection of videos can be found on this nice site; must be used in a filtered environment for safety reasons.
David Kapuler is an educational consultant with more than 10 years of experience working in the K-12 environment. For more information about his work, contact him at dkapuler@gmail.com and read his blog at cyber-kap.blogspot.com

Top 5 Ways to Make YouTube Viewing Safer for Schools

1.     YouTube: Safety Mode - This is a great new feature which is simple to use. By clicking on the safety mode button at the bottom left of a YouTube screen, it filters inappropriate words from comments and doesn't allow inappropriate videos to be played.

2.     ViewPure - Nice way to remove comments and ads from YouTube video and easy to use. Also, can install a bookmarklet into your browser for convenience.

3.     Safe Share TV - Great site which generates a unique safe URL for viewing YouTube content.

4.     Silentube - Installs a bookmarklet in your browser to watch all YouTube, Viddler, and Vimeo videos in peace.

5.    

 

 

Glogster poster for Teachers on Web 2.0 possibilities:

 

 

©2013-2014 SPEAQ

C3 site created and developed by Ron Mastine for SPEAQ

 

 

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